Face Recognition Policy Development Template For Use In Criminal Intelligence and Investigative Activities

This resource is designed to provide guidance to state, local, tribal, and territorial law enforcement entities, fusion centers, and other public safety agencies on developing policies and procedures for the use of face recognition tools in criminal intelligence and investigative activities. Details and Download

Five in 5

The Criminal intelligence Coordinating Council’s (CICC) Five in 5 is a snapshot of law enforcement and criminal intelligence-related articles, resources, and research that may be of interest to CICC members and partners working to improve the nation’s ability to develop and share criminal intelligence. Read the Latest Edition   or   View the Archives

Five in 5; Criminal Intelligence Coordinating Council

Technology Innovation for Public Safety (TIPS)

Addressing Precipitous Increases in Crime FY 2018 Competitive Grant Announcement

Applications Due: May 1, 2018
Read the Full Announcement (PDF)

Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs

Video Evidence: A Law Enforcement Guide to Resources and Best Practices

Designed for chiefs, sheriffs, and line officers to provide answers to straightforward questions they may have regarding properly securing, collecting, storing, and analyzing video, as well as to provide sources for training. Details and Download

Video Evidence coverpage thumbnail Video Evidence background section thumbnail Video Evidence FAQ thumbnail

Information Sharing News News Archive | Subscribe

Watch the National Forum Session on Data Access 101 via Facebook Live on August 1 @ 2 PT

The National Criminal Justice Association (NCJA) will stream the session “Data: What It is, Why You Need It and What in the World to Do With It” live from the National Forum on Criminal Justice on August 1 from 2:00-3:30 pm PT.  This session is geared for novices and addresses issues and questions including: Data:  we need it to decide which problems to tackle, to choose which initiatives to fund, and to measure whether those programs are working as planned. But do we have the data we need? If not, who does and will they share? How do we know if the data are telling us what we need to know? And how in the world do we pay for the analysis? Presenters are Jeff Bender, Deputy Commissioner, NYS Division of Criminal Justice Services; and Terry Salo, Deputy Commissioner, NYS Division of Criminal Justice Services. Glenn Fueston, Executive Director, MD Governor’s Office of Crime Control and Prevention will serve as moderator.
NCJA will stream this session using Facebook Live at https://www.facebook.com/thencja and the recording will be available on the NCJA website at http://www.ncja.org/home.

 

Source: NCJA
Free Online Training on the Global Reference Architecture

SEARCH and the National Center for State Courts recently launched a new version of the training course on the Global Reference Architecture (GRA), a framework and set of standards that makes it easier, faster, and more affordable for justice and public safety practitioners to design effective information sharing solutions. This updated and self-paced online training course is presented in 10 modules and helps stakeholders gain a common understanding of the GRA framework, standards, methods, and processes. 

The training demonstrates how to establish a governance structure, develop an information sharing architecture, model and document services, and create information models.   The course includes interactive, hands-on implementation labs that tie lessons together and is presented via an easy-to-use interface integrating narration, video, and written text with a certificate of completion option. 

The GRA Training Course is suitable for a range of trainees, including executives, senior managers, project managers/coordinators, and implementers.  

Source: SEARCH NCSC
Retired News Reporter Develops Algorithm to Try and Identify Serial Killers Using UCR Data

In 2004, Thomas Hargrove, a 61-year-old retired news reporter from Virginia, became aware of the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Supplementary Homicide Report and contemplated whether it was possible to teach a computer how to spot serial killers.  He spent months trying to develop an algorithm that would identify unsolved cases with enough commonalities to suggest the same murderer.  Hargrove eventually founded the Murder Accountability Project (MAP), a small nonprofit seeking to make FBI murder data more widely and easily available.  MAP has already assembled case details on 638,454 homicides from 1980 through 2014, including 23,219 cases that had not been reported to the FBI.  This is the most complete list of case-level details of U.S. murders available anywhere, and the group’s Web site has made it available at no cost to anyone with statistical analysis software.  

NW3C Virtual Currency Online Training

The National White Collar Crime Center (NW3C) recently released an online training course on virtual currency.  The 30-minute course covers basic information and concepts that serve as an introduction to virtual currencies and their relationship to other types of currency.  It covers various types of virtual currency, including the difference between decentralized and centralized currencies, with a strong focus on Bitcoin: what it is, how it is stored, and Bitcoin-specific investigative tips and techniques.  Individuals must have an NW3C online learning account and be employed by a law enforcement organization to access the no-cost training.

Most Hackers Can Access Systems and Steal Valuable Data Within 24 Hours: Nuix Black Report

Cybercrime is an ever-growing issue for state, local, tribal, and territorial law enforcement.  With advancements in technology, coupled with the oversharing of personal information, law enforcement needs to not only ensure the public’s safety online but also be cognizant of the digital footprint that people are leaving behind.  The National White Collar Crime Center (NW3C) has developed an online training course based on the Understanding Digital Footprints—Steps to Protect Personal Information resource.  The 35-minute course introduces the concept of digital footprints and best practices in protecting personal identifying information.  Topics include understanding consequences of oversharing personal information, limiting an individual’s digital footprint, protecting privacy on social media sites, and steps to take after becoming a target of doxing.  Individuals must have an NW3C online learning account and be employed by a law enforcement organization to access the training.

How Do I...?

Featured Downloads

This Web site is funded in whole or in part through a grant from the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. Neither the U.S. Department of Justice nor any of its components operate, control, are responsible for, or necessarily endorse, this Web site (including, without limitation, its content, technical infrastructure, and policies, and any services or tools provided).